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Our vision and our responsibility are to end extreme poverty in all its forms in the context of sustainable development and to have in place the building blocks of sustained prosperity for all.”

We observed the fastest reduction in poverty in human history, there are half a billion fewer people living below an international poverty line of $1.25 a day. Child death rates have fallen by more than 30%, with about three million children’s lives saved each year, deaths from malaria have fallen by one quarter, this record progress has been driven by a combination of economic growth, better policies, and the global commitment.

Focused to fulfill the vision of promoting sustainable development, we must go beyond the MDGs. They didn’t focus enough on reaching the very poorest and most excluded people, they were silent on the devastating effects of conflict and violence on development, the importance to development of good governance and institutions that guarantee the rule of law, free speech and open and accountable government was not included, nor the need for inclusive growth to provide jobs. Most seriously MDGs fell short by not integrating the economic, social, and environmental aspects of sustainable development. The result was that environment and development were never properly brought together; people were working hard but often separately on interlinked problems.

Let’s start with current MDGs, what to keep, what to amend, and what to add trying to listen to the views of women and men, young people, parliamentarians, civil society organizations, indigenous people and local communities, migrants, experts, business, trade unions and governments. The most important, we listened directly to the voices of hundreds of thousands of people from all over the world, in face-to-face as well as through our social media channels with our community opinions.
 We considered the massive changes in the world, the changes that are likely to unfold by 2030. There are a billion more people today, with world population at 7-Billion, and another billion expected by 2030. More than half of us now live in cities. Private investment in developing countries now dwarfs aid flows.
 Above all, there is one trend climate change which will determine whether or not we can deliver on our ambitions. Scientific evidence of the direct threat from climate change has mounted. The stresses of unsustainable production and consumption patterns have become clear, in areas like deforestation, water scarcity, food waste, and high carbon emissions.
 Losses from natural disasters including drought, floods, and storms have increased at an alarming rate. People living in poverty will suffer first and worst from climate change. The cost of taking action now will be much less than the cost of dealing with the consequences later.
 We should move from reducing to ending extreme poverty, in all its forms. We should ensure that no person regardless of ethnicity, gender, geography, disability, race or other status is denied universal human rights and basic economic opportunities. We should design goals that focus on reaching excluded groups, making sure we track progress at all levels of income, and by providing social protection to help people build resilience to life’s uncertainties.
 We can be the first generation in human history to end hunger and ensure that every person achieves a basic standard of wellbeing. There can be no excuses which everyone must accept their proper share of responsibility.
 Put sustainable development at the core, the international communities are aspired to integrate the social, economic, and environmental dimensions of sustainability, but no country has yet achieved this goal, we must act now to halt the alarming pace of climate change and environmental degradation, which pose unprecedented threats to humanity. We must bring about more social inclusion; it’s a universal challenge, for every country and every person on earth will require structural change, with new solutions, and will offer new opportunities. 
 Developed countries have a special role to play, fostering new technologies and making the fastest progress in reducing unsustainable consumption. Many of the world’s largest companies are already leading this transformation to a green economy in the context of sustainable development and poverty eradication. Only by mobilizing social, economic and environmental action together can we eradicate poverty irreversibly and meet the aspirations of eight billion people in future. 
 Transform economies for jobs and inclusive growth, call for a quantum leap forward in economic opportunities and a profound economic transformation to end extreme poverty and improve livelihoods. This means a rapid shift to sustainable patterns of consumption and production harnessing innovation, technology, and the potential of private business to create more value and drive sustainable and inclusive growth. Diversified economies, with equal opportunities for all, can unleash the dynamism that creates jobs and livelihoods, especially for young people and women. 
 It is a challenge for every country on earth to ensure good job possibilities while moving to the sustainable patterns of work and life that will be necessary in a world of limited natural resources. We should ensure that everyone has what they need to grow and prosper, including access to quality education and skills, healthcare, clean water, electricity, telecommunications and transport. We should make it easier for people to invest, commence a business and to trade. And we can do more to take advantage of rapid urbanization; cities are the world’s engines for business and innovation with good management they can provide jobs, hope and growth, while building sustainability. 
 Build peace and effective, open and accountable institutions for all, freedom from fear, conflict and violence is the most fundamental human right, and the essential foundation for building peaceful and prosperous societies. At the same time, people the world over expect their governments to be honest, accountable, and responsive to their needs. We are calling for a fundamental shift to recognize peace and good governance as core elements of wellbeing, not optional extras. Responsive and legitimate institutions should encourage the rule of law, property rights, freedom of speech and the media, open political choice, access to justice, and accountable government and public institutions. We need a transparency revolution, so citizens can see exactly where and how taxes, aid and revenues from extractive industries are spent. These are ends as well as means. 
 Forge a new global partnership, perhaps the most important transformative shift is towards a new spirit of solidarity, cooperation, and mutual accountability that must underpin the post-2015. A new partnership should be based on a common understanding of our shared humanity, underpinning mutual respect and mutual benefit in a shrinking world. This partnership should involve governments but also include others people living in poverty, those with disabilities, women, civil society and indigenous and local communities, traditionally marginalized groups, multilateral institutions, local and national government, the business community, academia and private philanthropy. It’s time for international community to use new ways of working, to go beyond an aid plan and put its own house in order to implement a swift reduction in corruption, illicit financial flows, money-laundering, tax evasion, and hidden ownership of assets. 
 We must fight climate change, champion free and fair trade, technology innovation, transfer and diffusion, and promote financial stability. And since this partnership is built on principles of common humanity and mutual respect, it must also have a new spirit and be completely transparent. Everyone involved must be fully accountable from vision to action. 
 But their impact will depend on how they are translated into specific priorities and actions. We realized that the vision would be incomplete unless we offered a set of illustrative goals and targets to show how these transformative changes could be expressed in precise and measurable terms. 
 The suggested targets are bold, the indicators that track them should be disaggregated to ensure no one is left behind and targets should only be considered ‘achieved’ if they are met for all relevant income and social groups. 
 We recommend that any new goals should be accompanied by an independent and rigorous monitoring system, with regular opportunities to report on progress and shortcomings at a high political level. We also call for revolution for sustainable development, with a new international initiative to improve the quality of life of citizens. We should actively take advantage of new technology, crowd sourcing, and improved connectivity to empower people with information on the progress towards the targets. 
We believes that the above all basic issues can remove the barriers that hold people back, and end the inequality of opportunity that blights the lives of so many people on our planet for long last, bring together social, economic and environmental issues in a coherent, effective, and sustainable way....... with  H.E. Governor Dr. Acc. Colombo Marco Lombardo.

 

 

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The situation in Syria are Ruin of Humanitarian and the ordinary people paying the price for the failure to end the conflict, that even among that harsh reality and the possibility looming that humanitarian’s critical to ease the suffering might have to be shut down, needs to resolved and support  as much as to reduce the existing crisis.

The political parties have increasingly entrenched in a brutal conflict that are not only-shattering Syria’s present, but also destroying its future.  Major cities have devastated, there was no blood bank or even suture thread at a hospital where more than 3,500 war-wounded patients were treated, and people were bombed while lining up for some bread, and children were murdered, tortured and subjected to violence. 

We must find out the ways to decreases the violence and stop the bloodshed, we stressing our request on behalf of the Syrian people, but also on behalf of all those seeking to assist them. We are looking forward to you to take the immediate measure to end this brutal conflict.

1.     The things will go on getting worse there might be up to 3.5 million Syrian refugees by the end of this year and 6.5 million in needs of humanitarian assistance inside the country.

2.     The situations aren't just frightening, its risk becoming simply unsustainable.  No way to adequately respond to those enormous humanitarian needs and it’s difficult to imagine a nation could tolerates much suffering. It’s a miracle, our combined efforts and collective duty to assist all Syrians who sought safety abroad.

3.     Syria presented much more than a humanitarian crisis  as the conflict risked spilling over across the region and escalating into a political, security and entire humanitarian disaster that would completely overwhelm the international response capacity.  To avoid such situation  the first step to provide substantial support to the two countries Jordan and Lebanon most dramatically impact by the conflict and refugee outflow. Turkey provided $750 million in direct assistance to more than 300,000 refugees.

4.     There are victims of raped in front of their fathers and husbands tortured and humiliated.  It was likely the estimated hundreds of survivors were only the “TIP OF THE ICEBERG”.  Government and opposition forces were abducting women and children to extract intelligence or use them as leverage for prisoners’ release.  Plus, civilian vulnerability and the possibility of “revenge rapes” are increased as the conflict became more sectarian and violations more militarized, with the presence of foreign fighters, including those affiliated with Islamist groups.

5.     Everyone knew that war could be brutal, exceptto fight it on the bodies of women and children can never be acceptable.  JUSTICE MAY BE DELAYED, BUT IT WILL NOT BE DENIED.  We pursue by all means & find the way and one day brings you to justice.

6.     A catastrophe for civilians, and children are suffered in the most heart-breaking way, this emergency, indeed, is a children’s crisis, noting there were no more than 3 million children affected inside the country, of whom almost 2 million were internally displaced.

7.     After two years of “trading in the fate of Syria and the blood of its citizens”, there must be earnest work to help move the country forward via a political solution endorsed such a political solution.

8.     Regarding the impact of the Syrian crisis on neighboring countries  the fighting shifted at borders, threatening its security and affecting its society and economy.  Lebanon is the smallest neighbor with the least resources, yet it had received the most Syrian refugees, soon to comprise almost one quarter of the population.  While Lebanon would never close its borders to anyone seeking refuge from the horrors of violence and destruction  it’s uncertain with the international community to share the burden.

9.     That the destruction of essential infrastructure  including schools and hospitals, devaluation of the currency from 80% to 90% loss of value rising food prices, fuel and electricity shortages, and lack of water are impacts on the majority of Syrians.  The needs were growing rapidly and be most severe in the conflict and opposition-controlled areas.

10. The economic collapse had stripped people of their ability to cope.  As needs grew dramatically, so too did the constraints inhibiting the ability to scale up the humanitarian response.

11.  Syria’s main cities been devastated, that crossed the front lines witnessed the extraordinary destruction in the city, large parts of which didn't have running water because of electricity problem.  Waste are piling up, raising fears that diseases would multiply as the summer heat approached.  Worrying growing concerns about outbreaks of diarrhea, and potentially even cholera, if the most basic of services could not be urgently restored.

12.  The international community has a moral responsibility to support the Syrian people in their struggle,” which must be done, as the humanitarian situation threatened regional peace and stability. The international community failed to provide the necessary protection to many people who were killed at the time when they needed our support.

Its prime responsibility the protection of their civilians goes to the States for shielding their own populations from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing,and related crimes against humanity and requires the international community to step in if this obligation is not met.

Inthe end to violence, access for humanitarian agencies to provide relief to those in need, the release of detainees, the start of inclusive political dialogue  and unrestricted access to the country for the international media.We want to build the bridge of peace to all the innocent civilians who have fallen victim to armed conflict and violence, to all the children deprived of a better future and to all those risking their lives to build peace and make this a better world.. with our beloved Honorable H.E. Governor Dr. Acc. Colombo Marco Lombardo.

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We want to draw your kind attention once again about the situation with regard to intolerance and discrimination based on religion or belief is alarming.

The global trend towards increasing contacts in the social, cultural and economic spheres, among others through the new information technologies, is being accompanied by the persistence or growth of extremism and of policies and practices which are detrimental to society and its different components, including minorities and women.
 Globalization clearly poses a challenge, we must ensure that its benefits are not confined to the rich of the developed countries and the elites of any country, so that excluded population groups will not be tempted by, or fall victim to, extremism, intolerance and discrimination.
 Inequality in international and national relations prompts marginalized groups to seek refuge in, religion, and religion can be abused for extremist ends.
 Needs to eradicate the all forms of Intolerance and of discrimination based on religion or belief are off course in separable from the issue of respect for all human rights economic, social and cultural rights, civil and political rights and the right to development. 
 To promote & protect the religious freedom, tolerance and non-discrimination are closely linked to the promotion of democracy and development. 
 We are requested to implement & extendable policies and measures on religious intolerance can within the limits of the mandate, make a contribution & Human Rights devote the fullest attention to religious extremism.
 The Global community must condemn that phenomenon unequivocally and combat it persistently in order to preserve the human right to peace.  
 As concerning women, stressing the need for a gender perspective to be applied and for gender specific abuses to be identified, try to give particular attention to country’s policies and practices which are discriminatory and generally detrimental to women.  
 We require paying special attention to the gender dimension in relation to education and freedom of religion or belief, plan of action which includes not only prevention but also efforts to combat discrimination attributable to religions or inadmissible practices. 
 We believes that state should intervention in matters of religion or belief must be limited, in accordance with law of nations to ensuring respect for the law, particularly criminal laws on, inter alia, the safeguarding of public order, fraud, violence, assault and battery, abduction and corruption of minors.  
 The development of an educational strategy should in fact not only permit the distribution of a culture of tolerance but also promote awareness and reasonable vigilance with regard to any abuse or danger in the area of religion.  
The global phenomenon of intolerance and discrimination based on religion or belief, it does emphasize the urgency of prevention, make plan and implement appropriate cultural, educational and social programs to promote the concept among civilizations.

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Poor people’s empowerment is necessary for pro-poor growth. Without empowerment chronic poverty persists and people are incorporated into a political economy in which they are either excluded from growth or they contribute to wealth creation without themselves gaining from it. Economic empowerment (e.g. better and fairer access to resources and participation in markets, Decent Work) is fundamental for pro-poor growth; when combined with political empowerment (e.g. rights, representation, voice, collective action) and social empowerment (e.g. expanded human capabilities, inclusion, non-discrimination). Its impact will be greater the different forms of empowerment interconnect and mutually reinforce each other.

1.   Donors can support empowerment processes through all of their aid instruments, from budget support to micro level projects. Even where the objectives may not seem directly related to empowerment, such as the construction of an irrigation system or rural roads, an intervention can be designed so that poor people’s empowerment is supported in its planning, management and delivery.

2.   Empowerment is not a new agenda for development co-operation. Off-course donors have long recognized its importance for sustainable development impact and poverty reduction.

3.   Donors have a great deal of experience in approaches that seek to involve and empower poor people including participatory planning, participatory rural appraisal and community based management.

4.   These approaches have been used in donor funded projects, the development of Poverty Reduction Strategies and the design and delivery of sector programs. Most general budget support programs involve associated donor support for the role of organized civil society in policy making and program planning at national and local level in order to strengthen the voice of poor people and improve accountability to them.

5.   The promoting the empowerment of those living in poverty means acquiring a better understanding of the existing inequitable power relations that keep people in poverty and marginalize them from decision making. Donors need to understand how interest groups will react to, and seek to influence, programs they support in order to be able to design interventions which have a realistic prospect of shifting the balance of power in favor of poor people. Again donors are not starting from scratch. There are many effective tools are available that are suitable for a range of aid modalities, from simple stakeholder analyses to more complex approaches for identifying drivers of change.

6.   Empowerment is complex and multidimensional and it takes time to change deeply implant power relations. However, this also means that there are multiple entry points and that, although empowerment doesn’t happen overnight, supporting empowerment in one domain, economic, social or political will have positive effects in the others. Putting in place, and operating, the management mechanisms and processes that will allow a program or project to be delivered in a way that empowers people takes time and may delay the delivery of physical program outputs.

7.   Donors need to value empowerment outcomes, their contribution to the sustainability of program impact and their multiplier effects beyond the program in order to be able to properly balance the importance of short/long-term impacts in program design and management.

8.   People empower themselves. It is the exercise of power by poor people, influencing economic, social and political process, that itself empowers them. Donors cannot empower, but with governments and development partners they can play a significant role both in creating an enabling environment for empowerment and also in providing direct support for people’s own actions to empower themselves.

9.   Empowerment outcomes will depend on the strength of the underlying foundations within countries, including the nature and strength of the social contract between the state and its citizens, the importance given to transparency and accountability to citizens, the extent to which laws exist and are enforce, and convention and rights respected. Improving governance is already a high priority for development assistance and the target of significant amounts of aid. For aid to help achieve a more equitable outcome to the efforts of different interest groups to influence the state, donors need to sharpen the focus of their interventions on the governance issues of most relevance to poor people and ensure that their programs strengthen both the voice of poor people and the capacity of the state to respond.

10.   Donors are powerful actors in developing countries and important players in existing power relationships. They need to be aware that, in relation to empowerment, powerful players can rarely adopt neutral positions. Donor policies and programs can have unintended disempowering effects that negatively impact their poverty reduction objectives.

11.  These problems can be avoided by using appraisal processes that identify potential pitfalls which might weaken accountability to poor people or governance institutions. Empowerment involves risk. Empowerment processes change existing power relations and are characterized by contestation and competition for influence and control over opportunities, resources and assets that have real and significant value to those involved. There is always the potential for conflict. While there may be risks for donors, those most at risk will be the least powerful; the poor and marginalized people that donor interventions are seeking to benefit. Donors need to assess and be aware of the risks in promoting empowerment. They need to design program, and particularly exit strategies, so that the risks to poor people are minimized through specific measures to protect against and mitigate risks.

Donors can obtain further practical “how to” guidance and support on how to address the issues raised in this policy guidance note in their own programs from the series. These provide examples, case studies and information sources that donor staff, both management and technical specialists, can use in practice to promote the empowerment of poor people through their projects and programs as an objective in itself and as a means of promoting pro-poor growth and poverty reduction.

 

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Our vision is of a world that is human centered and genuinely democratic, where all human beings are full participants and determine their own destinies. We are one human family in all our diversity, living on one common homeland and sharing a just, sustainable and peaceful world, guided by the universal principles of democracy, equality, inclusion, voluntarism,non-discrimination and participation by all persons, men and women, young andold, regardless of race, faith, disability, sexual orientation, ethnicity ornationality.

We are facing grave and inter connected challenges. As actors inthe struggle for peace, justice and the eradication of poverty, we struggle to encounter daily the human impact of rising violence and armed conflicts, wide spread violations of human rights and unacceptably large numbers of people who are denied the means of a minimal human existence. At the same time, new and emerging diseases, such as human immuno deficiency syndrome/acquired immuno deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS), threaten to devastate entire societies.

Globalization and advances in technology create significant opportunities for people to connect,share and learn from each other, corporate driven globalization increases inequities between and within countries, undermines local traditions and cultures and escalates disparities between rich and poor, thereby marginalizing large numbers of people in urban and rural areas.

o   Women, indigenous peoples, youth, boys and girls and people with disabilities suffer disproportionately from the effects of globalization.

o   Massive debt repayments are still made by the poorest nations to the richest, at the expense of basic health care, education and children’slives.

o   Trafficking in women, sexual exploitation, drug trafficking,money-laundering, corruption and the flow of small arms promote insecurity. Some of the States are becoming weaker, while an unaccountable transnational private sector grows stronger.

o  Determined focuson economic growth through uncontrolled free markets, combined with the adjustment and stabilization policies of international financial institutions controlled by the rich creditor nations, are crippling many national economies, exacerbating poverty, eroding human values and destroying the natural environment.

o   Globalization should be made to work for the benefit of everyone to eradicate poverty and hunger globally, (1) establish peace globally, (2) ensure the protection and promotion of human rights globally, (3) ensure the protection of our global environment, and enforce social standards in the work place globally.

o   This can happen only if global corporations, international financial and trade institutions and Governments are subject to effective democratic control by the people. We will see a strengthened and democratized and a vibrant civil society as guarantors of this accountability.

o   If the architects of globalization are notheld to account, this will not simply be unjust, the edifice will crumble, withdire consequences for everyone. The wealthy will find no refuge, asintolerance, disease, environmental devastation, war, social disintegration andpolitical instability spread.

o   We wish to put forward a series of concrete steps to strengthen cooperation among all key personnel at the international, national, regional and local levels to make this vision a reality. Our plan of action includes steps that should be taken by civil society.

 

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Inflation remains serious in most developed economies. Inflation rates remain quiet inmost developed economies. Continuing large output gaps and downward pressure on wages in many countries are keeping inflationary expectations low.

It is observed that inflation in the US is moderated over 2012, down to about 2% from 3.1% in 2011. A further moderation in headline inflation is expected for 2013.In the Euro area, headline inflation continues to be above the central banks’target of 2%. Core inflation, which does not include price changes in volatile items such as energy, food, alcohol and tobacco, has been much lower, at about 1.5%with no evidence of upward pressures.

1.    Focusing that inflation is expected to drift down slowly.Inflation in the new EU members is also expected to lessen. Deflation continuesto prevail in Japan, although the central bank has raised its inflation targetto boost inflation expectations.

2.    Receding in most but not all developing countries Inflation receded in a majority of developing countries during 2012, but remains stubbornly high in some.

3.    In the opinion, anticipated increases in world food prices provoked by droughts in various producer regions, persistently high oil prices and some country-specific supply-side constraints may continue to put some pressures on inflation in developing countries in 2013 and into 2014.

4.    While inflation moderated in many economies, the rate of inflation is still above 10% in Angola, Nigeria, and elsewhere. Inflation is expected to remain subdued in most of East Asia, but is still a concern for most countries in South Asia, where inflation rates were over 11% in 2012, onaverage, and are forecast to remain above or near 10% in 2013 and 2014.Inflation remains low in most economies in West Asia, although it is still high(above 10%) in Yemen and very high (30%) in the Syrian Arab Republic. Theinflation rate in Latin America and the Caribbean is expected to stay at about6%.

5.    One element of adjustment that is required by the withdrawal of external finance is to reduce any trade deficit that the country may have.Import growth is curtailed by exchange-rate depreciation and as real incomes and demands are squeezed by inflation and restrictive policy measures. However,growing economies need increased imports. In order to achieve this, rapid increases in exports are required to generate increases in foreign exchange earnings, both to purchase imports and service external debt.

6.    In this light, some fears have been raised that exports from adjusting countries will surge and that adjustment will come at the expense ofworkers in developed countries who will not be able to compete with the new low-cost imports.

7.    This fear seems exaggerated, especially in the developed countries in which total employment has been growing strongly. Nonetheless,individual import-competing sectors may feel more competition, as happens whenever exchange rates of foreign suppliers change to correct imbalances.

8.    If, however, such fears gathered political momentum, it might lead a developed country to raise protectionist barriers to these imports. Not only would that make the developing country adjustment more difficult and prolong the period of severe limitations on its imports, but it would only postpone not prevent the contraction of a declining industry.

9.    Always and inevitably, workers need to be transferred from declining and no-longer competitive sectors to growing ones. It is the proper role of government to make that transition as smooth, quick and socially non-disruptive as possible, not to avert such responsibility by adopting short-term palliatives.

10. Another global dimension of policy in the major developed economies stands in clear relief with respect to the present crisis.

11. If inflation in those countries should begin to rise, monetary authorities would be tempted to raise interest rates quickly in order to slow the growth of demand. In the developing countries, either the government would match the interest rate increase or the exchange rate would fall anew as investors sought out the higher foreign interest earnings.

12. A new reduction pressure would be put on the developing country;it would raise the country's foreign debt-servicing burden. The developing country's response would be to seek all the harder to increase exports and cut imports further, including those from the developed countries. There are thus both global and domestic considerations at play today in setting monetary policy in the major economies.

13. There is, still, one chance aspect of this problem at this time,the recent weakness of inflation and reduction of inflationary expectations inthe major economies provides their policy makers with a new degree of freedom in setting monetary policy.

14. Policies makers can now hold off tightening interest rates when they fear inflation are around the corner and wait until they turn the corner.If policy makers are uncertain about the need to tighten as 2013 progresses, the global dimension of their policy decisions adds weight to the case for patience... with our beloved Honorable H.E. Governor Dr. Acc.Colombo Marco Lombardo.

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The global economy continues to slow down, all the efforts to fight poverty.  Its concern about the energy crisis, particularly fuel prices, imbalances in the world economy, rising protectionism in trade, environmental degradation and the adverse impact of climate change & needs combination of policy options to combat challenges from the economic, social and environmental perspectives.
 The urgent need to restore in country’s economy to build a more inclusive and sustainable pattern of growth as underlined by the growing social unrest in both developing and developed countries lead the way for the trade and development & get initiate for the several policies and measures on how to achieve this in the current economic context. 
 Aim to improve livelihoods and good governance and to ensure a well-educated society.  Despite unfulfilled promises to developing countries, the international community must adopt a positive attitude towards development financing because development would stimulate demand and promote the exchange of goods, services and factors of production also stresses the crucial role of science and technology to achieve the goal as well as other internationally agreement targets, urging the diffusion of appropriate technology to expedite attainment of the Goals in developing countries.
 The external imbalances of the major economies are narrow substantially during the world economic and financial crisis.  The important components of global economic imbalances are   unprecedented accumulation of foreign reserves by a number of developing-world central banks, in part as protection against future crises.
 Adverse imbalances in international trade are exacerbating the impacts of the global economic and financial crisis, especially for developing countries, it’s also lack of political will to eliminate protectionist measures is negative impact on trade and growth.
 International trade is vital tool for long-term sustainable growth, emphasizing that developing countries should secure from protectionist barriers, especially agricultural subsidies, and calling for the extension of trade-related technical and capacity building assistance to them.
 We need for vigilance against rising protectionist measures, pointing out that least developing countries already struggling to stay afloat in the increasingly volatile global economy.
 Although the international consensus around the imperative of ensuring development centre globalization, the international trading system a crossroads.  The least developed countries in particular are deeply concerned that the specific package related to their situation including duty and quota free market access in the rules of origin, specific outcomes for trade-related aspects of cotton, a service waiver and accessions.
 The non-tariff measures, eliminates arbitrary or non-justified trade barriers to facilitate and accelerate negotiations with acceding least developed countries, and to define and agree on the details of a monitoring procedure for duty and quota-free market access and rules of origin.  The Aid for Trade and to help strengthen the capacity of least developed countries to access available resources, in support of the needs and demands expressed in their national development strategies.
 Trade and development should serve as the focal point for the integrated treatment of trade and development major achievements against the backdrop of continual threats to sustained recovery, the ongoing fragility of the world economy, rising income inequality, widespread unemployment.
 The recent slowdown in major growth poles in the developing world, as well as the euro zone crisis, persistent unemployment and rising inequality and polarization are clouding short-term trade prospects.  It also notes that longer-term challenges arose as the realities of the twenty-first century altered the way in which trade is conducted.
 The international trading system faces the important challenge of identify to negotiate to enhance the effectiveness.  The persistent development challenges point to the continuing necessity of supporting efforts by developing countries to build productive capacities and employment.
 It reviews recent trends in international official and private capital flows to developing countries, as well as current efforts to strengthen the international financial architecture.  Its  highlights ongoing challenges arising from the world financial and economic crisis and its aftermath, particularly in the key areas of financial regulation, multilateral surveillance, policy coordination, sovereign debt, the global financial safety net, the management of capital flows, and governance reform the institutions.
 Reviewed recent developments relating to the external debt of developing countries, with a special focus on the role of credit rating agencies and problems relating to the design of mechanisms for dealing with sovereign debt restructuring.  It concludes that while costly crises are sometimes driven by exogenous shocks, they may also be caused by irresponsible behavior on the part of both lenders and borrowers.  Prudent behavior can thus limit the cost and prevalence of debt crises.
 The middle income countries as a driving and stabilizing force in the global economy, any regression in their economies would likely be detrimental to all.  States governments harnessing the financial and operational efficiencies of the private sector through private public partnerships to stimulate productivity create employment and satisfy the infrastructural needs of the population, particularly those living in rural areas to enhance the financing for development follow-up process in order to improve efforts to mobilize resources through traditional as well as non-traditional means.
 The financial institutions to make more just and fair to least develop countries to concrete efforts to establish a new international order aiming at ensuring fairness balance trade, country emerging from conflict, to developing countries and those in post-conflict situations with a view to helping relieve their debt and contributing to their GDP so they could achieve sustainable development.
 We want on to note that the sovereign debt crisis in the euro-zone has not shown much sign of dissipating.  Since Europe was among the major export destinations and major sources of financial flows and tourism, the escalation of the crisis could significantly affect many developing countries, he cautioned.  Regarding trade, needs for vigilance against rising protectionism, though it has important to distinguish between that and the use of legitimate policy measures to promote industrial development and employment.
 The global economic crises underscored the importance of a transparent, inclusive and well-coordinate system of global economic governance to improve their governance structures, including the World Bank’s decision to increase the voting power of developing and transitional countries, and the doubling of IMF quotas, which increase their share of quotas and gave emerging economies two additional seats on the executive board.
 Warning that the global downturn could further aggravate poverty and threaten achievement of the MDGs to realize a single market and production base, which would include the progressive liberalization of the financial services sector and the integration of capital markets.  Emphasis on economic integration would boost regional trade and investment.
 Aid-for-Trade measures, support from partners and implementation of action to bring about other improvements, removal of trade barriers, enhanced capacity to mainstream trade within sectoral, national and regional, policies; improved transport and communications infrastructure with transit neighbors and simplified border procedures, reduce transit time and documentation requirements.  However much remained to be done in areas including export diversification, improving production capacity and climate change mitigation as well as protectionism also impeded the growth potential of landlocked developing countries.
 Global financial difficulties should not be an excused for trade protectionism. Recent food-price volatility is exacerbating the difficulties confronting global economic recovery.  While some developing countries are benefitted from the rise in commodity prices, most had experienced its negative impacts.
The international community needs to ensure that reforms overcame the shortcomings of the international financial system and monitoring mechanisms; many least developed countries needs debt reduction because they are overburden with the worst effects of the global economic and financial crisis, the international community to establish more tolerable debt levels, ensure the necessary institutional reforms and enhance the voice and representation of developing countries in the international financial institutions.  ...with our beloved Honorable H.E. Governor Dr. Acc. Colombo Marco Lombardo.

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DIRITTI UMANI:
PRINCIPIO 1: LE IMPRESE DOVREBBERO SOSTENERE E RISPETTARE LA PROTEZIONE DEI DIRITTI UMANI PROCLAMATI A LIVELLO INTERNAZIONALE.
PRINCIPIO 2: ASSICURARSI CHE ESSI NON SIANO COMPLICI NEGLI ABUSI DEI DIRITTI UMANI.

LAVORO:
PRINCIPIO 3: ALLE IMPRESE È RICHIESTO DI SOSTENERE LA LIBERTÀ DI ASSOCIAZIONE DEI LAVORATORI E RICONOSCERE IL DIRITTO ALLA CONTRATTAZIONE COLLETTIVA.
PRINCIPIO 4: L'ELIMINAZIONE DI TUTTE LE FORME DI LAVORO FORZATO E OBBLIGATORIO.
PRINCIPIO 5: L'EFFETTIVA ABOLIZIONE DEL LAVORO MINORILE.
PRINCIPIO 6: L'ELIMINAZIONE DELLA DISCRIMINAZIONE IN MATERIA DI IMPIEGO E PROFESSIONE.

AMBIENTE:
PRINCIPIO 7: ALLE IMPRESE È RICHIESTO DI SOSTENERE UN APPROCCIO PREVENTIVO NEI CONFRONTI DELLE SFIDE AMBIENTALI.
PRINCIPIO 8: PROMUOVERE INIZIATIVE PER UNA MAGGIORE RESPONSABILITÀ AMBIENTALE.
PRINCIPIO 9: INCORAGGIARE LO SVILUPPO E LA DIFFUSIONE DI TECNOLOGIE CHE RISPETTINO L'AMBIENTE.

ANTI-CORRUZIONE:
PRINCIPIO 10: LE IMPRESE SI IMPEGNANO A CONTRASTARE LA CORRUZIONE IN OGNI SUA FORMA, INCLUSE L'ESTORSIONE E LE TANGENTI.

STIAMO FACENDO DEL NOSTRO MEGLIO A LIVELLO GLOBALE CON IL SUPPORTO DEI NOSTRI INCREDIBILI MEMBRI DEL TEAM.

VIENI E UNISCITI A ACCADEMIA INTERNAZIONALE UMANITARIA OPERE - AIUO PER IL MEGLIO.

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LA PACE SIGNIFICA MOLTE COSE. PER ESEMPIO IL RISPETTO DEI BAMBINI CHE MAGARI HANNO LA PELLE PIÙ SCURA O CHE PARLANO UN PO’ MALE PER UN DIFETTO FISICO.
BISOGNA IMPARARE A RISPETTARE TUTTI, ANCHE QUELLI CHE NON SONO COME NOI E AIUTARE CHI NE HA BISOGNO, PER ESEMPIO GLI ANZIANI CHE SONO SOLI E NON HANNO NESSUNO CHE LI POSSA AIUTARE.
PACE È ANCHE CONSOLARE CHI È STATO OFFESO. BISOGNA INFATTI IMPEGNARE UN PO’ DEL NOSTRO TEMPO PER DARE UNA MANO A CHI È IN DIFFICOLTÀ. LIBERARSI DELL’EGOISMO È PACE.
NEL GIOCO NON SI DEVE SEMPRE COMANDARE PERCHÉ QUESTO ATTEGGIAMENTO PORTA A LITIGARE.
NON BISOGNA FARE LA GUERRA, PIUTTOSTO BISOGNA AIUTARE LE PERSONE CHE DURANTE LA GUERRA HANNO PERSO LA CASA E NON SANNO DOVE ANDARE. QUESTO BISOGNA FARE. LA GUERRA PORTA SOLO ODIO E TRISTEZZA. BISOGNA ESSERE BUONI E GIUSTI ANCHE CON CHI CI CIRCONDA E DONARE NON SOLO COSE MATERIALI, MA SOPRATTUTTO AMORE A CHI NON HA NIENTE PERCHÉ BISOGNA SEMINARE LA PACE.
SI DEVE LOTTARE PER OTTENERE LA PACE, MA NON CON LE ARMI MA CON LA FORZA DI VOLONTÀ E L’AMORE. LA PACE È UNA PIANTA CHE È DENTRO IL NOSTRO CUORE E NON BISOGNA FARLE MANCARE LA LUCE PERCHÉ SE NO MUORE. LA PACE È TUTTO CIÒ CHE SERVE AL MONDO.

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Non dimentichiamo mai che l’unione e l’amore fra tutti i popoli, danno sicurezza ed armonia, per affrontare i gravi disagi che colpiscono i nostri fratelli, che vivono nelle condizioni più disagiate. Non siamo indifferenti alle richieste di aiuto che ci arrivano da ogni parte del mondo, a tale grido rispondiamo porgendo una mano, ridando dignità a tutti coloro che con la sofferenza e privazione l’hanno persa.

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Cari amici, ringraziamo Dio per il dono del nuovo Papa Francesco I. E’ apparso sulla loggia di S. Pietro un uomo vestito di bianco che irradia umiltà, dolcezza e semplicità. Un Papa che ha iniziato il suo Pontificato recitando con noi le preghiere del buon cristiano. Un Papa che, come suo primo gesto, andrà a chiedere l’aiuto della Madonna perchè l’assista nel suo ministero di Vescovo di Roma, che presiede alla carità della Chiesa universale. Un Papa che si chiamerà Francesco e che vuole abbracciare tutti gli uomini come fratelli. Siamo grati alla Madonna per questo dono del suo amore materno alla Chiesa e al mondo intero.

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